Giving Thanks

Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday. Yes, I do love Christmas and all the sparkly lights and Hallmark movies that come with it. But Thanksgiving is different. It’s an opportunity to turn yourself off and solely focus on what matters: friends and loved ones and great food! No rushing out to buy last minute Christmas presents; no balancing your gift budgets. It’s about rediscovering the art of conversation, catching up with siblings, watching football teams that play better than the embarrassing Jets and Giants! And a chance to use my oven and fill my fridge with food! (We single busy freelancers don’t get to do that too often!).

Thanksgiving is also a chance to reflect. As I writer, I know I’m thankful for a few things, including excellent spelling skills and a working Internet connection. But I’m also thankful for the lives I touch. When I write an employee recognition piece, there isn’t anything more satisfying than receiving a follow-up call or email from someone thanking me for acknowledging him/her. “I took the article home to show my family,” wrote one employee. “We read it at the dinner table.” That’s when you know your work really hits home – literally!

Recognizing that people like a pat on the back, let’s hope workers everywhere get thanks – and give thanks – this season. Here’s to slowing down and appreciating the little things in life during Thanksgiving, Christmas and beyond!cornucopia

It’s beginning to look a lot like…

Christmas. Thanksgivingkah. Yes, the holidays are here. And for freelancers, it’s particularly interesting. What to do when you don’t have an office party to call your own?

I like the Freelancers Union’s approach to this – on December 9th, they’re holding an Unoffice Holiday Party in New York, giving freelancers and independent business owners a chance to mingle in one place. You can be sure I’ll be there; I’m even bringing a friend.

As a freelancer over the years, I’ve been pretty lucky, though. My friends tend to invite me to their office parties as an honorary employee. And of course, there’s usually a client luncheon or party; those are always nice, too.

When it comes to gifts, it’s mandatory to remember the agencies/clients who continually give you work. Even if business was lean this year, a pretty card can’t hurt, or a bottle of wine, box of chocolates. While most consider this to be common sense and good etiquette, you’d be surprised how many people forget that a bit of thanks goes a long way. A Director friend of mine was shocked a couple of years ago when she didn’t receive one bottle of wine from her freelance editors. That’s a no-no.

To conclude: always acknowledge the companies that help you pay your bills and put food on the table. 

Happy Thanksgiving! Image