Timing is Everything

I just received an e-blast from a major New York steakhouse with the subject line, “Need a drink?” Um, it’s 10:00 a.m., so the answer to that questions is “no.” hurricane

Obviously the steakhouse is advertising a new cocktail promotion but at this hour of the morning, people are still on their first or second cup of coffee. An email like that should not be distributed until late afternoon when most people’s work days are winding down. Messages need to be timed accordingly so audiences will read them at just the right moment. For my clients, I generally try to opt for 10 or 11 a.m. (when many are caught up and settled in at their desks), or after lunch.

I actually deleted the email from the steakhouse but decided to retrieve it to take a peek at the content….which brings me to my second point:

If you’re going to send an e-blast to customers, make it worth opening. Why not include a striking visual of the martini you’re promoting, or better yet, a happy couple sipping the martinis? When I opened this particular restaurant’s e-blast, it was simply a yellow banner with links to the restaurant’s social media pages. No imagery, no copy. Just lots of white space. That tells me that the steakhouse just threw the email out there; to send it just to send it. If you’re not going to make an effort to jazz up your content, how can customers be sure that you’re going to make an effort in the kitchen or at the bar? It’s just plain sloppy marketing.

My third and final point has to do with frequency. It drives me crazy when I receive too many e-blasts from one particular business or organization. In the case of the steakhouse, I get one a week, which in my opinion, is way too often for a restaurant. Eating and drinking establishments should save mass email distribution for special occasions, like New Year’s Eve and Valentine’s Day menus, or Open Mike nights and poetry readings. In the case of nonprofits, you can get away with greater frequency (especially during end-of-year appeals, but even those emails should be spaced out accordingly). In each instance, messaging should target a different angle or program to vary the content and keep people reading.

Bonus point: Don’t forget about social media. Before drafting your e-blast, think about it: is this the right communication channel for this particular message? If you’re running a campaign, perhaps the information needs to go viral. In that case, social media is definitely the way to go. Using hashtags and tagging the appropriate contacts are surefire ways to drum up traffic and place you in the spotlight.

Advertisements

KellyKassEditorial Launches!!

Today I unveiled my new website, http://kellykasseditorial.com. Many thanks to everyone who’s given me lovely feedback including Liking my Facebook page.

While I’ve written for multiple channels over the years, there’s nothing like having your own “baby” and seeing your name in lights, so to speak. As writers, we don’t always get credit for our work; we’re often behind the scenes crafting the words to make businesses shine. (And I’m certainly not complaining about that!). It’s simply what we do.

Of course, I’ll continue to blog on WordPress, but be sure to stop by my Facebook page for additional commentary and writing tips.

Thank you!

Making the good sell

This week, I finished writing the copy for my soon-to-be-launched website.

As I composed the text, I couldn’t help but notice how challenging it is to write about yourself. When I’m writing about clients (e.g. creating their online bios), it’s much easier for some reason. I guess it’s because I’m being paid to make them sound as accomplished as possible – embellishing and “bragging” is highly permitted! When I’m writing about myself, I’m conscious about not sounding too full of myself. Sure, you want to sound competent and qualified but it’s important not to overdo it so you don’t sound arrogant or egotistical.

Sometimes it’s better to let other people do the boasting which is why I’ve included testimonials from clients and former colleagues who know me best. It’s lovely seeing so many compliments in writing but editing the text? That’s quite a task also. How can you possibly amend copy that is singing your praises? FYI – I wound up using the most relevant information and dividing other comments into snippets to place throughout the site.

When it comes to writing about yourself, always have your resume handy (or your LinkedIn profile). Both help to refresh your memory about past work experience and accomplishments.

Another aspect of writing about yourself is that in the end, you feel pretty darn good reviewing everything you’ve accomplished in your still-growing career. When you’re living it, you don’t always have time to observe all that you’re doing for your clients or to let their happy reactions sink in. It’s always on to a new project.

So, freelancers, be sure to take time to appreciate your successful projects and don’t be afraid to pat yourself on the back for a job well done.